Characodon garmani


 
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Parras Goodeid
(Characodon garmani)

 
syn. -

 
distribution:

Mexico: Río Mezquital, Río Nazas / Coahuila

 
local name: -

 
size: ca. 4 cm (length) (?)

extinction date: shortly after 1895

 
The goodeids are a small group of so called livebearing fish, that means they do not lay eggs like most other fishes, but produce really completely developed offspring. The only exceptional cases are found within the two genera Crenichthys and Empetrichthys, which have been placed in this family only in the year 1981.

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The genus Characodon consists now of five species, some of which are yet not scientifically described. All species of this genus occur in the wild in waters which could be called puddles or runnels, and justifiably so. These throughout probably represent relicts of formerly much larger populations.

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The Parras Goodeid was described in the year 1898, it was found in a small, self-contained water system consisting of a spring near the town of Labor de Guadaloupe (?), as well as the spring regions of the two rivers Río Mezquital near the town of Durango and the Río Nazas near the town of Parras de la Fuente (?). More precise informations can unfortunately not be given today, because these waters do not exist in that way any longer.

The species must have been quite common at the time it was discovered. In 'The fresh water fishes of Mexico north of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec' from the year 1904 can be read:

Characodon garmani Jordan & Evermann is very abudant in a large spring in the city of Durango.

(source: S. E. Meek: The fresh water fishes of Mexico north of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. Field Columbian Museum - Zoology (5) 1904)

At this time the species may have been already extinct, the waters in which the fishes lived, were used up for irrigation of the cotton fields and dried out completely.

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Of this species, which was probably never kept nor bred in captivity, only one preserved specimen, a female, does still exist today.

 
References:

- S. E. Meek: The fresh water fishes of Mexico north of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. Field Columbian Museum - Zoology (5) 1904